Author Topic: Temple Appreciation - Respect the Greats  (Read 79 times)

Olive

Temple Appreciation - Respect the Greats
« on: November 08, 2018, 04:50:42 pm »
Housekeeping: Hey everyone - I've been a little quiet here what with my moving around and performing my rituals for the end of the cycle. But I have a lot that is being prepared to share with everyone. Very soon you will see the first writings of theological significance to our fledgling lunar canon. Also I have several recordings that are just about ready to be uploaded (one lecture already over 30 minutes), but unfortunately the connecting cable for my preamp was damaged during transit so I've been unable to put the finishing touches on them to make them suitable for upload. I'm going to replace it today though, so TL;DR - much material is coming.


But for now, I thought I would make something a little more light-hearted and discussion oriented. There is an element of Temple-building as one of the longer term goals of Artemism, as stated in the introduction. So I thought we could talk a little bit about which of these great constructions we most enjoy and why that is.

It has been said that a temple is a tool for spiritual development. Meaning, one has to know how to use the temple, and what kind of mentality to approach it in, to get the most out of it. Unfortunately this is not possible for most of the greatest ancient sites of worship still present; but we are not totally lost. The Architecture and the experience of visiting them often speak for themselves to a large extent. This is why in ancient times Architecture was considered the greatest art (or among the greatest), sometimes even beyond writing. A writing must be translated and decoded by a set of rough definitions and interpretation. Architecture is meant to be beheld. It exists not only in the realm of concepts but also in the realm of extension and impenetrability.

There are so many great sites I should like to talk about in time - but I'll start us off with a few of my favorites, one at a time.

Note: Any temple associated with the Moon or Lunar deities should be specially marked so that a list of such structures can be made for the consideration and appreciation of Lunar Devotees.


1. The Kailash Temple

This has long been one of my favorite sites - and it is truly an amazing temple unparalleled by any other. It is named after Mount Kailash, which is considered to be the location where Lord Shiva resides and a holy site. It pays homage to him with a lot of Shaivite imagery such as Nandi the cow of Shiva and the Shiva Lingam. But many aspects of Hinduism are represented more generally - such as depictions of the different incarnations of Vishnu.

The entire thing was carved out of a single rock, starting from the top and working downwards. This in itself in somewhat incredible, but it is even more so when we consider that the site contains many rooms, pillars, statues, and bas reliefs, as well as windows, hidden peepholes, rainwater collection and a working drainage system (not to mention the bridges, balconies, huge staircases, and hidden underground passages). Many of the reliefs and statues are breathtaking works of art in their own right - retelling the famous stories of the Ramayana and Mahabharata in a visual format.

it was a bedrock excavation with no stone added - so there was zero room for error. All of this had to be carefully planned from the beginning. And on inspection, no errors were made.

200,000 - 500,000 tons of rock was removed, leaving behind the incredible structure. This was not merely limestone or soft sandstone - it was solid Basalt. Crystalline volcanic igneous rock.

There is a legend about the site dating back to the 17th century. It claims that the emperor Aurangzeb sent 1000 workers to fully dismantle the great temple. After three years, it suffered only minimal damage in the form of a few broken or disfigured statues. Realizing that it would be impossible to destroy the site, the emperor gave up.

Modern historical perspectives often date the site's construction to the 750s during the reign of Krishna I, but this is uncertain and in my view - highly unlikely. It is claimed that the temple was constructed in some 19 years. This would mean that at least 55 tons of rock would have to be cut every hour for 12 hours a day throughout that time span. Then, of course, the rock would have to be removed and the remaining exposed rock had to be intricately carved to form a temple fit for a god.

The rock that was removed has not been found, nor have the tools used to construct it. It is worth noting that nearby there are also many carved ruins which are now totally submerged - possibly from the same civilization that created the Kailash temple.

H.P Blavatsky claimed that the temples in this area date back much further than what scholars believe today. And in my view this seems likely, as it is still not understood at all how such a feat of construction was possible at that time. It is possible that it is an ancient site that has been progressively worked on over many centuries in different phases of work.


This is by no means the goal I have in mind for the Temple of Artemis - it would take a herculean effort to produce anything resembling this in the modern era. Perhaps over many many years of diligent work a rival could be constructed, but I dare not set my sights so high as of now. I'm only bringing this forth so that we can appreciate the work of the ancients, and form more robust ideas about what the possibilities of a temple are.


I went a little longer on this than expected, so I'll just leave a few pictures. It's impossible for me to show off everything about the site, so I recommend doing some research of your own if you're interested. I'll return shortly to speak about two more sites - one Indian and one Akkadian - and then we can go from there. Looking forward to see what sites hold the fancy of our members. :)

« Last Edit: November 08, 2018, 04:52:52 pm by Olive »
    Art thou pale for weariness
Of climbing heaven, and gazing on the earth,
     Wandering companionless
Among the stars that have a different birth, -
And ever-changing, like a joyless eye
That finds no object worth its constancy?

-Percy Bysshe Shelley

Little Beast

Re: Temple Appreciation - Respect the Greats
« Reply #1 on: November 09, 2018, 07:51:03 am »
That was a good read.

I was actually born into a theosophical family. I was amused during the earlier years of my life when a fellow metalhead (I was once a metal artist musically) said that LaVeyan Satanism is a "gateway drug" into occult psycho-activism. I was like "Bitch please... Blavatsky and Crowley are the weed and tobacco of modern esoteric thought, and LaVey is just a lollipop you stick in your gob when you get drymouth". I'd much rather study architecture and its vibrations, and put forth similar implications that my 2nd most beloved Sufi mystic Dorris Lessing had about it in her Canopus in Argos series (a better read than the Book of Dzyan).

Onyx

Re: Temple Appreciation - Respect the Greats
« Reply #2 on: November 09, 2018, 08:31:46 am »
Quote from: Olive
The Architecture and the experience of visiting them often speak for themselves to a large extent. This is why in ancient times Architecture was considered the greatest art (or among the greatest), sometimes even beyond writing.

It's interesting how prominent "megalithic" structures were in ancient times, even in civilizations which were assumedly pretty far removed from each other. In that last image, the structures look to be at least 15 meters tall.

How things like this but also the heads of Easter Island, creations of the Egyptians and Mayans, and Stonehenge were even possible is beyond my comprehension.

Little Beast

Re: Temple Appreciation - Respect the Greats
« Reply #3 on: November 09, 2018, 08:47:06 am »
... is beyond my comprehension.

I strongly doubt that my friend.

pi_rameses

Re: Temple Appreciation - Respect the Greats
« Reply #4 on: November 09, 2018, 12:07:04 pm »
 As always, great job @Olive
"Some say Kos, others Kosm.
As you did for the vacuous Rom,
grant us eyes.
Grant us eyes."

-Micolash, Host of the Nightmare

Onyx

Re: Temple Appreciation - Respect the Greats
« Reply #5 on: November 09, 2018, 02:27:00 pm »
... is beyond my comprehension.

I strongly doubt that my friend.

Haha, perhaps I should have said "beyond my level of patience". :)

Little Beast

Re: Temple Appreciation - Respect the Greats
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2018, 03:28:02 pm »
Haha, perhaps I should have said "beyond my level of patience". :)

It's spelled "patients" my good doctor.