Author Topic: The Anthology of Km Anu  (Read 2669 times)

Xepera-maSet

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Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #45 on: November 15, 2019, 02:35:52 pm »
I wish you were in the Phoenix area, my wife would do it in a heartbeat

Hapu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #46 on: November 15, 2019, 04:22:58 pm »
It feels like a freaking unsolvable puzzle.

I personally consider three general responses to be valid in any situation:

1. Accept the situation. (By which I mean, gracefully.)
2. Change the situation.
3. Abandon the situation. (For example, find a new job.)

#1 is always available though often difficult. #2 is only sometimes available without committing a crime. #3 is always available though often difficult.
 
In my opinion you must, for your own sake, choose one of the above.

Km Anu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #47 on: November 15, 2019, 04:54:43 pm »
I wish you were in the Phoenix area, my wife would do it in a heartbeat

hey I might be moving to Nevada soon, maybe we can satanic ritual and chill sometime, lol

Km Anu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #48 on: November 15, 2019, 04:56:03 pm »
It feels like a freaking unsolvable puzzle.

I personally consider three general responses to be valid in any situation:

1. Accept the situation. (By which I mean, gracefully.)
2. Change the situation.
3. Abandon the situation. (For example, find a new job.)

#1 is always available though often difficult. #2 is only sometimes available without committing a crime. #3 is always available though often difficult.
 
In my opinion you must, for your own sake, choose one of the above.

oh i’ve committed to option two, the change is just slow coming. so far ive blown the whistle twice and im doing a book drive :mrgreen:

Km Anu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #49 on: November 27, 2019, 09:42:15 am »
I'm very bad at organizing my thoughts into words, which is why I draw. Its easier to tell stories with images. Unfortunately, I can't explain Voidism like that. I may do some brainstorming here in the next few days so that I can pin down a topic. Its just hard. Its easiest to write on meds, but I'm usually at work in that scenario. I'd have to up my dose to start taking them on my off days. On top of that I don't even really have time to write at home between my family and my other obligations. I don't know what to do. It almost feels as if I can't remember how to start.

Km Anu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #50 on: November 27, 2019, 09:56:21 am »
I just re-read that entry and frankly I'm glad that version of me is dead. I'm going to get started now.

I'm setting too many limits on myself. Adapt and overcome.

Km Anu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #51 on: December 08, 2019, 08:45:25 am »
Got rings :thumbsup:

MRT

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #52 on: December 08, 2019, 11:01:47 am »
Very nice!!  :thumbsup:  :thumbsup: :thumbsup:

Km Anu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #53 on: January 02, 2020, 02:50:33 pm »
This thing is getting dusty.

2020 is the year of runes for me. I'm taking a break from my old daily structures to deep dive into The Nine Doors Of Midgard (Edred Thorsson). My old runic studies are too sparse and indirect, I need a complete and strong foundation. I'll probably keep my own runic system, but its on hold, relegated to practical sorcery and supportive work. My Vibrational tradition will be that of 9DoM's presented version of Galdr. It's kind of heavy, but I'm not really that concerned after working with Kelly's stuff these last what...five months? The practice devolved into a non-structured and highly customized echo of what it started as, but that was almost a good thing. If I'm going to put down something concrete, then I can't be making magical discoveries every day. It needs a rest period to gather information.

Km Anu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #54 on: January 11, 2020, 12:57:00 pm »
And somehow still he sings to me,

In storms and strife, in winter rains,

Return to me that starry spark,

Heka abound, and brightest night,

And sinking dark, and burning gloom,

An ocean yet call above!

"The night!" They call, "He culls in the night!"

Oh Father, Devine brother,

Come to me in my hour of need.

Throw wide the gates of abyssal dissention,

Splinter the minds of the dreams,

Lulling in the milk of the sun,

Feed me from the flow of Wode,

Inscribe my ancestors across my skull,

Line my mind with visions of their weakness,

Then fury,

Then kill me.

That I may become more.

Km Anu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #55 on: February 11, 2020, 12:40:39 pm »
Just some notes for myself for later:

Quote
1.7 million people

Tens of thousands of people (both soldiers and civilians) were killed in the conquest of Jerusalem. The Crusaders themselves suffered; historians estimate that only one in 20 survived to even reach the Holy Land. It is estimated that 1.7 million people died in total.
- From the Washington post on the crusades


Quote
The Byzantine Emperor - to regain lost territory and defeat a threatening rival state.
The Pope - to strengthen the papacy in Italy and achieve ascendancy as head of the Christian church.
Merchants - to monopolise important trading centres currently under Muslim control and earn money shipping crusaders to the Middle East.
Knights - to defend Christianity (its believers and holy places), follow the principles of chivalry and gain material wealth in this life and special favour in the next one.
- motivations for the crusades, ancient. E.U (not the best sorce TBH)


Quote
It was found that from 1990 to mid-2018, abuse reports about 382 priests were made to the Church, with 625 children, mostly under 16, sexually abused by members of the Catholic clergy.
- Wikipedia, children abused by the church


Quote
According to a 2004 research study by the John Jay College of Criminal Justice for the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops, 4,392 Catholic priests and deacons in active ministry between 1950 and 2002 have been plausibly (neither withdrawn nor disproven) accused of under-age sexual abuse by 10,667 individuals. Estimating the number of priests and deacons active in the same period at 110,000, the report concluded that approximately 4% have faced these allegations. The report noted that "It is impossible to determine from our surveys what percent of all actual cases of abuse that occurred between 1950 and 2002 have been reported to the Church and are therefore in our dataset."[47] The Augustin Cardinal Bea, S.J. specializes in abuse counseling and is considered an expert on clerical abuse; he states "approximately 4% of priests during the past half century (and mostly in the 1960s and 1970s) have had a sexual experience with a minor."[48][49] According to Newsweek magazine, this figure is similar to the rate of frequency in the rest of the adult population.[50]
In 2014, the Permanent Representative of the Holy See to the UN, Silvano Maria Tomasi, appeared before the Committee against Torture and reported that during the previous ten years, 3420 cases of abuse against minors had been investigated and 884 priests had been removed from their positions and reduced to lay status.[51] Allegations of and convictions for sexual abuse by clergy have occurred in many countries. There are no accurate figures available on the number of sexual abuse cases in different regions. But, in 2002 The Boston Globe reported, "clearly the issue has been most prominent in the United States."[15] The US is the country with the highest number of reported Catholic sex abuse cases.[52]
After the United States, the country with the next highest number of reported cases is Ireland.[31] A significant number of cases have also been reported in Australia, New Zealand, Canada, and countries in Europe, Latin America, Africa, and Asia.[53]
In response to the attention, members of the church hierarchy[who?] have argued that media coverage has been unfair, excessive, and disproportionate.[16][failed verification] According to a Pew Research Center study, in 2002 the media coverage was focused on the US, where a Boston Globe series initiated widespread coverage in the region. However, by 2010 the focus had shifted to Europe.[12][13]
In September 2011, a submission was lodged with the International Criminal Court alleging that the Pope, Cardinal Angelo Sodano (Dean of the College of Cardinals), Cardinal Tarcisio Bertone (Cardinal Secretary of State), and Cardinal William Levada (then-current Prefect of the Congregation for the Doctrine of the Faith) had committed a crime against humanity by failing to prevent or punish perpetrators of rape and sexual violence in a "systematic and widespread" concealment which included failure to co-operate with relevant law enforcement agencies.[54] In a statement to the Associated Press, the Vatican described this as a "ludicrous publicity stunt and a misuse of international judicial processes." Lawyers and law professors emphasized that the case is likely to fall outside the court's jurisdiction.[55]
On 13 May 2017, Pope Francis acknowledged that the Vatican had a 2,000 case backlog of sex abuse cases.[56]
- wiki, sexual abuse by the church


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Witch-hunts also took place during the 17th century in the American colonies. These were particularly common in the colonies of Massachusetts, Connecticut and New Haven. The myth of the witch had a strong cultural presence in 17th century New England and, as in Europe, witchcraft was strongly associated with devil-worship.[3] About eighty people were accused of practicing witchcraft in a witch-hunt that lasted throughout New England from 1647 to 1663. Thirteen women and two men were executed.[4] The Salem witch trials followed in 1692–93, culminating in the executions of 20 people. 5 others died in jail.
It has been estimated that tens of thousands of people were executed for witchcraft in Europe and the American colonies over several hundred years. Although it is not possible to ascertain the exact number, modern scholars estimate around 40,000–50,000.[A] Common methods of execution for convicted witches were hanging, drowning and burning. Burning was often favoured, particularly in Europe, as it was considered a more painful way to die.[5] Prosecutors in the American colonies generally preferred hanging in cases of witchcraft.[5]
- wiki, people killed on witchcraft allegations


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Conspiracy accusations[edit]
In 1984 MacFarlane warned a congressional committee of scatological behavior and animals being slaughtered in bizarre rituals that children were forced to watch.[34] Shortly after, the United States Congress doubled its budget for child-protection programs. Psychiatrist Roland Summit delivered conferences in the wake of the McMartin trial and depicted the phenomenon as a conspiracy that involved anyone skeptical of the phenomenon.[35] By 1986, social worker Carol Darling argued to a grand jury that the conspiracy reached the government.[35] Her husband Brad Darling gave conference presentations about a Satanic conspiracy of great antiquity which he believed now permeated American communities.[17]
In 1985, Patricia Pulling joined forces with psychiatrist Thomas Radecki, director of the National Coalition on Television Violence, to create B.A.D.D. (Bothered About Dungeons and Dragons). Pulling and B.A.D.D. saw role-playing games generally and Dungeons & Dragons specifically as Satanic cult recruitment tools, inducing youth to suicide, murder, and Satanic ritual abuse.[36] Other alleged recruitment tools included heavy metal music, educators, child care centers, and television.[36] This information was shared at policing and public awareness seminars on crime and the occult, sometimes by active police officers.[36] None of these allegations held up in analysis or in court. In fact, analysis of youth suicide over the period in question found that RPG players actually had a much lower rate of suicide than the average.[36]
By the late 1980s, therapists or patients who believed someone had suffered from SRA could suggest solutions that included Christian psychotherapy, exorcism, and support groups whose members self-identified as "anti-Satanic warriors".[37] Federal funding was increased for research on child abuse, with large portions of the funding allocated for research on child sexual abuse. Funding was also provided for conferences supporting the idea of SRA, adding a veneer of respectability to the idea as well as offering an opportunity for prosecutors to exchange advice on how to best secure convictions—with tactics including destruction of notes, refusing to tape interviews with children, and destroying or refusing to share evidence with the defense.[38] Had proof been found, SRA would have represented the first occasion where an organized and secret criminal activity had been discovered by mental health professionals.[39] In 1987 Geraldo Rivera produced a national television special on the alleged secret cults, claiming "Estimates are that there are over one million Satanists in [the United States and they are] linked in a highly organized, secretive network."[40] Tapings of this and similar talk show episodes were subsequently used by religious fundamentalists, psychotherapists, social workers and police to promote the idea that a conspiracy of Satanic cults existed and was committing serious crimes.[41]
In the 1990s psychologist D. Corydon Hammond publicized a detailed theory of ritual abuse drawn from hypnotherapy sessions with his patients, alleging they were victims of a worldwide conspiracy of organized, secretive clandestine cells who used torture, mind control and ritual abuse to create alternate personalities that could be "activated" with code words; the victims were allegedly trained as assassins, prostitutes, drug traffickers, and child sex workers (to create child pornography). Hammond claimed his patients had revealed the conspiracy was masterminded by a Jewish doctor in Nazi Germany, but who now worked for the Central Intelligence Agency with a goal of worldwide domination by a Satanic cult. The cult was allegedly composed of respectable, powerful members of society who used the funds generated to further their agenda. Missing memories among the victims and absence of evidence was cited as evidence of the power and effectiveness of this cult in furthering its agenda. Hammond's claims gained considerable attention, due in part to his prominence in the field of hypnosis and psychotherapy.[42]
SRA accusations, wiki

Km Anu

Re: The Anthology of Km Anu
« Reply #56 on: March 18, 2020, 12:47:22 pm »
Happy birthday Me.

Wish everything wasn't closed, wish I didn't have to cancel my party.


Stop fucking eating bats.