Author Topic: LBM Ethics  (Read 538 times)

Onyx

LBM Ethics
« on: May 09, 2017, 12:16:15 am »
From Michael Aquino's "Black Magic":
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Lesser Black Magic (LBM) is the influencing of beings, processes, or objects in the OU by the application of obscure physical or behavioral laws.

LBM is an impelling (encouraging, convincing, increasing of probability) measure, not a compelling (forcing, making inevitable) one. The object is to make something happen without expending the time and energy to make it happen through direct cause-and-effect.

And:

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As you become adept in LBM, you will be tempted to use it for all manner of personal gratification. The more skilled you are, the more you will be inclined to think that you can get away with almost anything. The governing factor is not whether you can or can’t, but rather whether your consciously-determined ethics allow you to.

As you begin to direct your life independently of morals, codes, and customs imposed upon you by the politics and propaganda of society, you will have to assume the responsibility for your own ethics. Only if you are known to be a strictly ethical individual will your freedom from social norms be tolerated. Otherwise you will be ostracized and probably persecuted by society.

The argument for self-control is more than apparent in these words. Anton LaVey also described the dilemna of personal ethics in his usual colorful way:

From "How and When to Lie" in "The Satanic Witch":
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In order to master the art of lying, you must first master a few other things. The Great Imposter, Fred De Mara, will always command a certain degree of respect, because he could actually do the things for which he claimed legitimate standing! There is nothing wrong with saying you sang at Carnegie Hall and you could have stood in the doorway at midnight and hummed a few measures, but if you open your mouth to sing at the next party and it sounds rotten, you have just, as they say, blown it.

Two things occur to me. The first is that I find it difficult to believe that an individual can realize their true potential serving a jail sentence. Secondly, there is the matter of self-chosen ethical guidelines, which may be subject to change over time. As Dr. Aquino astutely suggests: "...in Black Magic there is no turning back".
« Last Edit: May 09, 2017, 12:19:38 am by Onyx »
Arise thus in your glory, behold the genius of your creation, and be prideful of being, for I am the same – I who am the Highest of Life.

Sutekh

Re: LBM Ethics
« Reply #1 on: May 09, 2017, 06:09:05 am »
Aside from LBM Ethics, I have never used LBM to others before.  In my opinion LBM can perhaps work psychologically unless if it is used discreetly. I was originally a practitioner within Scientology where I learned to apply my own version of LBM but without Ethics. This soon backfired on me when I tried using it on people such as my parents, but I was much more younger at the time without realizing of having the purpose of ethics.  LBM has always remained a mystery to me whether it works usefully or instead it doesn't which is why I do not use LBM  due to risks of destroying the existence of others surrounding me in general.  But what is interesting about LBM is others such as myself might perform it unconsciously without knowing on another subject.  This has happened to me before when others have used LBM techniques onto me without knowing of its effectiveness. What has always remained an eye opener for me was the Temple of Set's guidelines on not performing LBM to another Setian. I can understand this perfectly however what has always come to question is what if you accidentally did an LBM onto a fellow Setian in the Temple without knowing? Iv'e always wandered if expulsion would still come into place even if done without knowingly.
"Our collective ambition is that the membership of the Order of the Serpent also serves as guardians of the Black Flame and collaborates with the Prince of Darkness in the Infernal Mandate of re-creating the Cosmos in the eternal glory of the Setian Will!"-Setamontet

Xepera maSet

Re: LBM Ethics
« Reply #2 on: May 09, 2017, 01:28:49 pm »
When dealing with clients, social work is literally straight LBM. It blew my mind that my occult studies were almost more useful than my college courses when I started as a social worker, and I still feel that way. It's a very fine line between guiding a client and deceiving or manipulating them. If they don't do the work themselves no change will come. I've literally been told by supervisor to give less effort to cases because you should never be more dedicated to the program than clients themselves.

CLEARING MY HEAD, WILL LIKELY RETURN

Xepera maSet

Re: LBM Ethics
« Reply #3 on: September 17, 2017, 06:56:48 am »
I am bumping some interesting topics new members may have missed and want to see.

CLEARING MY HEAD, WILL LIKELY RETURN

NEMO 93

Re: LBM Ethics
« Reply #4 on: September 17, 2017, 02:40:56 pm »
I've struggled with ethics of both lesser and greater magic. The bit on lying is great advice. If you're too far away from society, you have way less of a chance to further your will.

The problem I face as an existentialist is troubling.  Jean-Paul Sartre's on Being and Nothingness is challenging for an individualist. It states that "existence precedes essence" which is esentially means you are free to be anything you choose. When a student was faced with a moral dilemma between joining the war and staying home and taking care of his mom, he simply instructed to to do what he wished and the student realized he would be defined by his actions. The weight of these decisions led to the saying "men are condemend to be free." However, the troubling aspect is Sartre's concept of bad faith. Sartre states the only way to act in bad faith is to "allow yourself to be so defined that you forget your freedom or to allow others to define you." The later is what is challenging from an individualist experience.

If you look outside your window, and see a man standing in a trench coat and hat, you realize that he is observing you and subconciously start to change your behavior a little. Once you look closer and realize that it is just a coat hanger holding up these items, you realize and go back to normal. This normal state is what Sartre's brand of ethics struggles to have constantly. However, in our modern society it becomes extremely tough to accomplish this. This is why Sartre states that "hell is other people."

This gets even more interesting when you explore the concept of love. If you love someone, then you would never want to define them and take away their freedom yet you also wish to possess them and integrate them into your being. This is hard to accomplish and many struggles in human relationships arise from bad faith due to this.

Xepera maSet

Re: LBM Ethics
« Reply #5 on: October 30, 2017, 04:25:34 pm »
[Admin bump]

CLEARING MY HEAD, WILL LIKELY RETURN