Author Topic: LIBER III VEL JUGORUM  (Read 574 times)

NEMO 93

LIBER III VEL JUGORUM
« on: October 08, 2017, 10:31:39 pm »
0.
0. Behold the Yoke upon the neck of the Oxen! Is it not thereby that the Field shall be ploughed? The Yoke is heavy, but joineth together them that are separate — Glory to Nuit and to Hadit, and to Him that hath given us the Symbol of the Rosy Cross!

Glory unto the Lord of the Word Abrahadabra, and Glory unto Him that hath given us the Symbol of the Ankh, and of the Cross within the Circle!

1. Three are the Beasts wherewith thou must plough the Field; the Unicorn, the Horse, and the Ox. And these shalt thou yoke in a triple yoke that is governed by One Whip.

2. Now these Beasts run wildly upon the earths and are not easily obedient to the Man.

3. Nothing shall be said here of Cerberus, the great Beast of Hell that is every one of these and all of these, even as Athanasius hath foreshadowed. For this matter1) is not of Tiphereth without, but Tiphereth within.

I.
0. The Unicorn is speech. Man, rule thy Speech! How else shalt thou master the Son, and answer the Magician at the right hand gateway of the Crown?

1. Here are practices. Each may last for a week or more.

(a) Avoid using some common word, such as “and” or “the” or “but”; use a paraphrase.

(b) Avoid using some letter of the alphabet, such as “t”, or “s”. or “m”; use a paraphrase.

© Avoid using the pronouns and adjectives of the first person; use a paraphrase.

Of thine own ingenium devise others.

2. On each occasion that thou art betrayed into saying that thou art sworn to avoid, cut thyself sharply upon the writs or forearm with a razor; even as thou shouldst beat a disobedient dog. Feareth not the Unicorn the claws and teeth of the Lion?

3. Thine arm then serveth thee both for a warning and for a record. Thou shalt write down thy daily progress in these practices, until thou art perfectly vigilant at all times over the least word that slippeth from thy tongue.

Thus bind thyself, and thou shalt be for ever free.

II.
0. The Horse is Action. Man, rule thine Action. How else shalt thou master the Father, and answer the Fool at the Left Hand Gateway of the Crown?

1. Here are practices. Each may last for a week, or more.

(a) Avoiding lifting the left arm above the waist.

(b) Avoid crossing the legs.
Of thine own ingenium devise others.

2. On each occasion that thou art betrayed into doing that thou art sworn to avoid, cut thyself sharply upon the wrist or forearm with a razor; even as thou shouldst beat a disobedient dog. Feareth not the Horse the teeth of the Camel?

3. Thine arm then serveth thee both for a warning and for a record. Thou shalt write down thy daily progress in these practices, until thou art perfectly vigilant at all times over the least action that slippeth from the least of thy fingers.

Thus bind thyself, and thou shalt be for ever free.

III.
0. The Ox is Thought. Man, rule thy Thought! How else shalt thou master the Holy Spirit, and answer the High Priestess in the Middle Gateway of the Crown?

1. Here are practices. Each may last for a week or more.

(a) Avoid thinking of a definite subject and all things connected with it, and let that subject be one which commonly occupies much of thy thought, being frequently stimulated by sense-perceptions or the conversation of others.

(b) By some device, such as the changing of thy ring from one finger to another, create in thyself two personalities, the thoughts of one being within entirely different limits from that of the other, the common ground being the necessities of life.2)

Of thine own Ingenium devise others.

2. On each occasion that thou art betrayed into thinking that thou art sworn to avoid, cut thyself sharply upon the wrist or forearm with a razor; even as thou shouldst beat a disobedient dog. Feareth not the Ox the Goad of the Ploughman?

3. Thine arm then serveth thee both for a warning and for a record. Thou shalt write down thy daily progress in these practices, until thou art perfectly vigilant at all times over the least thought that ariseth in thy brain.

Thus bind thyself, and thou shalt be for ever free.


1)
(i.e. the matter of Cereberus).
2)
For instance, let A be a man of strong passions, skilled in the Holy Qabalah, a vegetarian, and a keen “reactionary” politician. Let B be a bloodless and ascetic thinker, occupied with business and family cares, an eater of meat, and a keen progressive politician. Let no thought proper to “A” arise when the ring is on the “B” finger, and vice versa.

NEMO 93

Re: LIBER III VEL JUGORUM
« Reply #1 on: October 08, 2017, 10:32:57 pm »
Michael Kelly comments on this in Apophis:

"If the Initiate realises that his vigilance has lapsed and he has used the forbidden word, or – equally terrible – he cannot remember whether he has used it or not, then Mr Crowley would suggest slashing the forearm viciously with a razor blade in order to drive the lesson home.  However, I tend to agree with Kenneth Grant when he suggests that this action can serve to actually widen the gulf between the conscious and subconscious minds and is not to be recommended.  Training by punishment always breeds secret resentments, which is the last thing we want.  Instead, if you realise that you have slipped up, just smile wryly and take note of the fact, promising your whole mind that with its help you will improve.  This more gentle approach to training may take longer, but the mental bridges thus built will stand upon firm and lasting foundations.  You want to build your mind into an integrated, focused tool, not have it cowering and snarling like a whipped cur."


What do you guys thing? Is a harsh punishment or encouragement a better way to discipline your mind?

Xepera maSet

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Re: LIBER III VEL JUGORUM
« Reply #2 on: October 08, 2017, 11:32:32 pm »
I think the text is far too harsh. It wants to punish someone into a conscious mindset, and for its author that was a type of submission, a death of selfhood.

"My step is great, that I may traverse the sky."
- The Pyramid Texts


NEMO 93

Re: LIBER III VEL JUGORUM
« Reply #3 on: October 09, 2017, 01:01:05 am »
@Xepera maSet

I'd have to disagree with that. It is for submission but not of submission to the author but of submission of your base desires to your higher self. This doesn't necessarily have to be a mystical thing but your idealized self/ego.

Apophis by Michael Kelly, who studied under the Temple of Set, uses many of these tactics and embelishes on them in the Second Head of The Dragon to help one come come to build their selves.

The seem to have similar motivations, control over one self by promoting awareness and ability to control your awareness and great link to your subconcious. I think a program similar to either Liber Jogorum or the first two heads of Apophis are absolutely necessary if one is to either dabble in or seriously practice Greater Magick. There are so many elements that can go wrong in greater magic without an ability to control thought, mind, and body.

Thefore my concerns with the method of punishment vs encouragement is one of practical results. I think Kelly has a good point in saying that punishment can separate you from your subconcious which would be a huge error in either Left Hand Path or Right Hand Path. However, encouraging one or something into submission is still dominating it and it is hard to see if punishment actually does cause a divide. I understand the theory he posits but this is completely ignoring sadomassochistic relationships which use both punishment and nurture to grow.

It's important to note that works like this in Apophis program, LHP, and Thelema, MP or RHP, is that there are two "selves." A false self that works against your will and a true self that is the master of your own universe.  It is aboslutely necessary to purge weakness in both paths. The main difference is RHP tends to see it as something that must be overcome where as the LHP sees it as something to bind into your service so it may further your will. Though this may vary in both paths.

For example, the ring idea which could seem like it's dilluting yourself is given a practical benefit for LHP in Apophis. If you can control your view point and emotion, then you can manifest anger n a time where it would further your will and surpress it in a time where it would set your goals back rather than to overcome it and see it as something to be detached from at all times like RHP would.

In my own personal opinion, I think eradicating your own weakness is even more imporant in Left Hand Path. On the Right Hand Path, you have equivalences of praying. You have faith in a higher power that all works will take you where you need to go even if it's your HGA(which some LHP schools believe in as well). On the Left Hand Path, you are completely responsible for yourself. Strengthening your ego and acheiving Godhood does not come without sacrificing weakness.

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Re: LIBER III VEL JUGORUM
« Reply #4 on: October 09, 2017, 01:05:11 am »
I can't post much right now, just want to clarify I'm not against the punishing or anything. Just the extreme of truly harming the body through wrist slashing. There are much less harmful ways to condition the mind.

"My step is great, that I may traverse the sky."
- The Pyramid Texts


NEMO 93

Re: LIBER III VEL JUGORUM
« Reply #5 on: October 09, 2017, 01:27:23 am »
@Xepera maSet

Ah, okay. That makes a lot of sense. Honestly, that was my initial reaction to the text as well. It wrote it off for about a year because of that. In fact, I only gave it a second look because the book Apophis showed me the value of the philsophy and removed the self-harm. It just seemed overly nasty on first glance. I'm gonna repy my thoughts out now before I head to bed but feel free to take your time in replying.

I am firmly against cutting the wrists but felt compelled to analyze why it was there with an open mind. I still feel against it but I think it's worth analyzing with an open mind in order to replace it an effective alternative and possibly to understand blood magic.

We have many stories about blood letting throughout culture. They used to do it to purge the demons, then to purge illness. There are people who self-harm as a coping mechanism. This all points to it possibly being a cartharitic experience rather in addition to or more than punishment? Perhaps it is included for the psychology of purging weakness. It would explain why Crowley chose this instead of say, self-flagelation which is more associated with religious punishment and occultism. Still, the wrist is a very risky place and I can't agree with that at all. There's also non self-harming ways of punishment. But still, if Michael Kelly is correct than any punishment would distant yourself from your subconcious which would be horribly counter productive for rituals and dream-work.

I do wonder if the taboo of bodily harm that repulses me and you from this text is just societal conditioning that antinomianism would reject. I mean, I point to the BDSM subculture as a part of this. It replaces bodily harm in a completely different context than usual and can become a positive thing. I wonder why it is that I feel more accepting of BDSM and less accepting of self-harm?

Personally, if I practice this I would be doing it in Kelly's fashion which removes punishment all together as it's proven that positive re-enforcment is more effective than negative ones.

One last note is i think the exercises in general are a good practice. I would speculate the barbaric self punishment is a blind if not for record of Fraters pracitcing this.