Author Topic: SATAN'S ROLE IN MILTON'S PARADISE  (Read 4 times)

Etu Malku

SATAN'S ROLE IN MILTON'S PARADISE
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SATAN'S ROLE IN MILTON'S PARADISE
by Etu Malku

Blake and Shelley both viewed Milton’s Satan as the hero in Paradise Lost. Blake and Shelley did not retain all of Satan’s qualities from Milton’s Paradise Lost when they created their own characters of Satan. Blake and Shelley both improved the qualities of Satan and made their own Satanic hero. This improves upon the Satanic tradition, enhancing the character of Satan so he appears in a beneficial and endearing light.

William Blake reads Paradise Lost as a “history of restraint and desire” which is shown between the struggle concerning Satan and God. Blake believed that you achieve freedom when you rebel against society, and in Paradise Lost, Satan yearns for his freedom. Blake sees himself as Satanic and believes that “a new heaven is begun” and the “Eternal Hell revives”. Blake did not believe in organized religion and he is also commenting on his abhorrence of the Church of England. The Devil rebels against an imposter deity who is symbolic of God. Blake’s message is that in every person there is a serpent-selfhood, Satan, which needs to be destroyed so the person can see the infinite. This is required for the person to be a prophet.

God as the villain
God creates everyone in the poem to fall, and the result of each fall is always greater subservience to God. If narcissism is supposedly the greatest sin in the story, I find it odd that God created all of his inventions with vanity as their main flaw - especially since this is the flaw that leads to both the fall of Satan and the Fall of Man. Lucifer champions individuality, while God demands obeisance. Struggle between reason (Lucifer) and faith (God). Milton laid the foundations of satanic logic. Satan’s reason holds a grain of truth that appeals to mankind. His logic is based on the concept of rising higher than his status and hiding the truth behind a seeming good. When Satan hears Adam and Eve talking about the forbidden tree, he wonders why they are not allowed to eat from it. Through his reason, eating from the tree of knowledge would make them better, which he sees as a good thing. Satan sees that God is envious of his creations. God’s whole plan is to keep everything for himself and keep all his creations enslaved. God feels threatened by his creations and needs to withhold things from them in order to keep them under control.

Satan as the hero
Satan’s reason is built upon the idea of becoming better than he already is. He believes that it is always possible to rise higher. Satan was the highest among the angels, yet he still felt confined by the hierarchy God had set in place. He reasoned there was no harm in seeking to better himself and rise even higher in the hierarchy. It was this manipulation of the natural order God had established that led to Satan’s fall. According to God, one cannot become more than they already are. Satan feels that because God created him with such a nature, that to be punished is wrong. He cannot help what he is. These thoughts lead to Satan projecting his own tyranny on God.

Lucifer to be the Serpent in the Garden of Eden and transformed the myth of the Fallen Morningstar into that of the angel Lucifer the principle of compassion for life and creation, defiance of corrupt authority and the current of spiritual evolution. The original sin contends that every human life begins under the curse of the Abrahamic god. This curse was the result of Adam and Eve innocently and ignorantly eating of the fruit from the tree of knowledge of good and evil. Partaking of this fruit enabled them the awareness of their subjective universes and allowed them to evaluate what was good and what was evil based on their own intelligence and experience . . . not the Abrahamic god's.

The Serpent in the Garden guided Adam & Eve away from the Abrahamic god and His faiths which are the chains of spiritual oppression holding back Mankind from true liberation. If one is to place an angel Lucifer with that of the serpent he makes his debut in the Testaments as the Serpent in the Garden of Eden pointing out to Eve that God is a liar and she will not die that day if she eats of the fruit of knowledge, which she did and did not die. Lucifer in this sense brought us the Truth of our Freedom of Will and shows us the way to self-deification. Lucifer represents the divine force of Creation that is able to carry out the idea of Creation. Lucifer sinks down to man's level and awakens the power of Creation and the sexual energy in man. Thus, man can reach the knowledge which was previously only accessible to God.

"What is more absurd and more impious than to attribute the name of Lucifer to the devil, that is, to personified evil. The intellectual Lucifer is the spirit of intelligence and love; it is the paraclete, it is the Holy Spirit, while the physical Lucifer is the great agent of universal magnetism." - Eliphas Levi

Aleister Crowley gave us the modern synthesis and foundation of Luciferian thought. "Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law" and "Love is the law, love under will". Two statements clearly set in motion the ascension of the seeking individual towards Godhead. In his poem, "Hymn to Lucifer" Crowley presents the bringer of light in a Thelemic aspect. No longer shall a man be subservient to a religion that would destroy your foundation and right of personal choice. Dogma is also a trap that can lead to spiritual stagnation. Growth is necessary through the freedom of an open being that through will power and focus can change take hold and run its natural course.

The "Fall" should be understood as the Spirit descended to Flesh. The vision of a cosmic struggle, forces of good contending against forces of evil, derived originally from Jewish apocalyptic sources and was developed by sectarian groups like the Essenes as they struggled against the forces they saw against them. God asks all the angels in heaven to bow before Adam, the new creation. Satan refuses to bow, believing obedience to humans to be idolatry against God, and is swiftly cast out of heaven for his disobedience. This is an example of self‑sacrificing love, agape, martyr. But instead of sacrificing material for spiritual fulfillment, he sacrifices spirit for the spirit.

Carl Jung saw the myth of figures such as the Lucifer/Satan archetype as expressing "the shortcomings of the world as conceived by the human soul." Lucifer/Satan "stands as the prototype of human civilizing effort."

Book of Job
In the Book of Job God is challenged by ‘one of his sons’ Satan which represents the ‘doubting thought’. God abandons his faithful servant Job and lets him fall without pity into the abyss of physical and moral suffering by murdering his sons and daughters, taking away his livestock, and eventually making the shattered Job of ill and suffering health.

Job, abandoned without protection and stripped of his rights, whose nothingness is thrown in his face at every opportunity evidently appears to be so dangerous to God that he must be battered down with God’s heaviest artillery. God’s robbery, murder, bodily injury is premeditating and he even denies a fair trial. He shows no remorse or compassion, but ruthlessness and brutality, he violates the very commandments he dictated to Man on Mount Sinai.

What is the reasoning behind God the Almighty’s resistance to such a little, puny, and defenseless man such as Job? There must be something which Man has the ability to achieve, and this something is the very same something found in the Garden of Eden story with the Serpent. God sees in Job something of equal in power which causes him to bring out his whole arsenal of destruction and parade it before his opponent. God projects onto Job a skeptic’s face which is hateful because it is his own, it questions his omnipotence.

God’s dual nature has been revealed. Job, in spite of his impotence, is set up by Satan to judge over God himself. God unwittingly raises Job’s spiritual consciousness by humiliating him, and in doing so God pronounces judgment on himself and gives Man moral satisfaction. God’s behavior is that of an unconscious being who cannot be judged morally. God is a phenomenon and, as Job says in the Bible, “not a man.” Not human but, in certain respects, less than human, which is how God described the Archdemon of the West Leviathan.

Job realizes God’s inner antinomy, and in the Light of this gnosis his knowledge attains a divine numinosity . . . as predicted in the debacle in the Garden of Eden, Job attains apotheosis with the assistance of Satan!