Author Topic: Money  (Read 1087 times)

Hapu

Money
« on: January 07, 2020, 08:50:45 pm »
Money is economic freedom. We on the Left Hand Path are vocal about our insistence on freedom, yet often we're silent about the economic dimension thereof.

If I want to be free from fear and want, I need money or else the benevolence of a moneyed patron. Or to be a Buddhist, I suppose.

Money makes the world go round. Money is the God of the capitalists. Put your money where your mouth is and most will not only listen but obey.

The one with the gold makes the rules.

Radical freedom is the freedom to do as I please, and for that, I need moolah, filthy lucre.

Lately Mammon has been on my mind.

We would find it startling if someone knocked on our door and said, "Do you know Mammon?" But of course there's no need for that. Mammon's temples are everywhere. Banks! And their far more predatory siblings: Casinos!

In Mammon We Trust, here in the USA. One Nation Under Money.

Isn't it rich?


Hapu

Mammon Ritual
« Reply #1 on: January 08, 2020, 10:43:17 am »
Mammon Ritual

This ritual is carefully constructed. Nothing in it is arbitrary. Perform it as is.

In preparation, listen to these at full volume.

Sound of bull roaring – go to the 26 seconds mark:
https://youtu.be/6SoeEP-pHA0

Sound of coins clinking:
https://youtu.be/67nLQ3Zl4_s

Sound of paper money being counted:
https://youtu.be/JrSlU1OJjl8

Now:

In a quiet, private space, either sit or stand, whichever is more comfortable for you. Do not kneel.

Throughout this ritual, fix your eyes on the Seal of Mammon, which I’ve attached. You may stare at this Seal on your computer, on your phone, on a piece of paper, or however else is convenient or most motivating for you. Just keep your eyes on the Seal.

Regulate your breathing.

Imagine a ring of boulders rising up from the ground all around you in a circle.

Imagine rushing water circulating all about the boulders in a circle all around you.

Imagine a rushing wind blowing over the water all around you in a circle.

Imagine giant flames burning in a circle all around you.

Imagine the sound of a bull roaring.

Imagine the smell of the interior of a new car.

Imagine the sound of coins clinking.

Imagine the smell of chocolate.

Imagine the sound of paper money being counted.

Imagine the smell of fresh, new paper money.

Imagine the sound of a bull roaring.

While inhaling, think the words, “Unexpected wealth,” then exhale.

While inhaling, think the words, “Unobstructed wealth,” then exhale.

While inhaling, think the words, “Uninterrupted wealth,” then exhale.

Inhale, then while exhaling onto the Seal, think the name “Mammon.” Repeat two more times.

That’s it. Done.

Disengage by closing your computer, placing your phone in your pocket, filing away your piece of paper, whatever applies. Leave the room. Do some unrelated task while thinking about some unrelated topic.

Perform this ritual no more than once a week.

Remember, Mammon helps those who help themselves, so if an opportunity for enrichment arises, but you have to take action in order to secure it, take that action.

Onyx

Re: Money
« Reply #2 on: January 08, 2020, 12:57:59 pm »
I did the working as described, left the room and looked around the house a bit. I have a few space heaters but all have failed except one. I intended to buy another soon, but after this exercise I found another one tucked away (which I really should have noticed before now), and it works fine.

So within minutes I already saved money through the electric sight gained from this exercise. Another thing that came to mind is that this place is rather akin to Sanford & Son's salvage yard, and I might as well start selling things off and pocket the change.

Good work @Hapu.






« Last Edit: January 08, 2020, 01:03:05 pm by Onyx »

Liu

Re: Money
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2020, 05:28:07 pm »
Thanks for sharing your work!

But why no changing of details?
E.g., I guess the smell of the inside of a new car is supposed to be associated with having the money to buy that? I would only get negative feelings from that, though. I don't like cars, I don't intend to buy any ever probably, and on long car or bus trips I get nauseous, so I also don't associate the smell with good feelings.
And for example the aptness of the coin and bill sounds could be culture-dependent.

I don't intend to use that ritual anytime soon anyway, just curious.
(it's not like I'm rich or earn a lot, I'm just stingy and frugal and so I don't really feel much of a desire for more money than I currently earn, and kindling such a desire seems rather counter-productive at the moment)
« Last Edit: January 08, 2020, 05:31:51 pm by Liu »

Onyx

Re: Money
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2020, 06:54:27 pm »
My interpretation of this working involves maintaining dominion:

Quote from: Hapu
The one with the gold makes the rules.

Equally important to having a fat wallet is maintaining dominion through acquiring skills and talents which outclass those of others. Therefore I daresay that "gold" is being used here in a symbolic sense.


Hapu

Re: Money
« Reply #5 on: January 09, 2020, 08:49:29 pm »
The rich are focal points of energy. This is what some magicians don't understand. Money is energy. On the physical plane it's just metal or paper or magnetic ones and zeroes. But on the anthropological plane it's energy, which means it's the capacity for doing work. By its availability things get done. By its absence they don't. Precisely like sunlight beaming down into the trees. Precisely and literally, not metaphorically. It's just a question of planes, physical versus anthropological. On the physical plane, light, heat, and electricity enable work. On the anthropological plane, money enables work.

Power is the amount of energy converted into work over unit of time. To have power is to have access to energy and a mechanism for converting energy into work. On the physical plane, one source of energy is gasoline, and one conversion mechanism is the engine of an automobile. On the anthropological plane, the energy is money, and one conversion mechanism is the payroll system, be it automated or manual. If you have a known work product, a coherent labor process, an adequate payroll system, and sufficient funds, you can get meaningful things done.

Magicians are often told to aim at end goals, not at money, because money is seen as merely a means to an end, and not necessarily the only means. There's wisdom in this, no doubt about it, but it's not the complete truth. If your end goal is something substantial on either the physical or anthropological plane, then anthropological resources will have to be rallied, and that means that sooner or later you will need money brought to bear, either by you or by your minions. For example, short of someone dying and bequeathing you their home, you will not take ownership of a house without money being brought to bear.

The magician who wants to have real impact must eventually forge a relationship with Mammon.
 

idgo

Re: Money
« Reply #6 on: January 10, 2020, 01:08:34 am »
Money as cash is an incarnation of Value, and perhaps its most universal one. I might call inequality the truly fundamental expression of value -- the human tendency to say "I would rather have that thing than this one, so much so that I will trade you for it" is what gives any form of trade its power -- but money is likely the most widespread and general form of trade.

It's no accident that value as "that thing has value because I will trade you something for it" bears the same name as moral values, as "I think that would be wrong and so I would not do it no matter how much someone paid me". These moral values, uncommon though they may be these days, delineate the only areas which Value-as-money cannot directly control. They seem somewhat unfashionable of late, which is a boon to capitalism as a system and the sorcerers who manipulate their worlds with it alike.

Cash is certainly the most prevalent incarnation of Value, but capitalism has constructed many competitors for it, some of which can even overpower it in their areas of expertise. A comparison of investment vehicles against the gradual devaluation of physical cash tucked under a mattress is the most obvious example, though units of work or thought from brands to clicks to cryptocurrencies are also presently in vogue. These work-units have their disadvantages against cash, of course, being relatively illiquid and inconvenient to convert between forms, but they have the advantage of being creatable directly from forms of power typically near the outskirts of Mammon's domain.

Hapu

Re: Money
« Reply #7 on: January 10, 2020, 09:01:27 am »
It's no accident that value as "that thing has value because I will trade you something for it" bears the same name as moral values, as "I think that would be wrong and so I would not do it no matter how much someone paid me". These moral values, uncommon though they may be these days, delineate the only areas which Value-as-money cannot directly control. They seem somewhat unfashionable of late, which is a boon to capitalism as a system and the sorcerers who manipulate their worlds with it alike.

Yes.

No one can serve two masters. Either you will love the one and hate the other, or you will detest the one and cling to the other. You cannot serve both piety and money.

Let the Christians take from that what they will, while I take exactly the opposite.

Hapu

Re: Mammon and Money
« Reply #8 on: January 10, 2020, 09:52:25 am »
From time to time a sorcerer will perform a ritual, and as a result the scales will fall from his eyes, and suddenly he will see that he has had a benefactor all along, and he will see what that benefactor has been doing for him. When this occurs, what remains for the sorcerer to do is say thank you. Remember this. The principle of courtesy has great currency in hell.

I performed the Mammon Ritual two days ago. This morning the scales fell from my eyes and I saw that Mammon had been my benefactor for decades.

At the company I work for, it is against corporate policy for someone with no Bachelor's Degree to hold the rank of second level manager. I hold the rank of second level manager and I have no Bachelor's degree.

I was promoted to second level manager some twenty years ago. In order for this to occur, I had to succeed at a task which had daunted some of those who were already at said rank. I did so. But I still would not have been promoted if I hadn't had a particular supervisor who was warrior enough to battle on my behalf. She fought and won, and then, as if she had done the one thing she had been there to do, she found a better opportunity elsewhere and left the company. I never heard from her again.

I remember the day I learned of my promotion being approved. On the morning of that day, as I was crossing the parking lot to enter the building I worked in, right in front of me a hawk swooped down from the sky and like a guided missile collided with the bird that had been its prey, and then flew off with its prize. As I caught my breath and my heart re-started, so startled was I, the certainty came to me that my promotion had been approved. And so it was.

At the company I work for, it is likewise against corporate policy for someone to work from home for more than two days a week. I work from home full time, all five days of the work week.

I had to have a good argument for this, and I did and still do. But arguments do not suffice when policy is being circumvented. A focal point of energy must weave the threads on one's behalf. My boss's boss is that focal point of energy. That she is willing is due to the confluence of factors that men call luck.

Finally, in recent months I found myself failing at a work task. For a variety of reasons I was ill suited to success. I may actually have failed had fate not intervened. A member of my work team had violated corporate policy flagrantly enough to earn termination. Someone had to take over his projects. My boss and boss's boss decided the most capable person to do this was me. Magically my prior responsibilities were removed from my shoulders and distributed among others on the team. I took over my new responsibilities. And the task I had been failing at was no longer mine. Someone else would finish it. I was off the hook.

Great and profound is the name of Mammon.

Money flows in two directions, toward and away. In my prior examples, money was flowing toward me in the form of a pay check. In this last example, money is flowing away from me in a commercial transaction.

Since 2009 my path has included physical exercise of a fairly strenuous nature. Recently, due to the debilitations of age, I can no longer engage in the kinds of exercise I used to. (Martial arts.) Nor can I jog or do anything that puts pressure on my feet, ankles, knees, calves, or thighs. I need something new. There is only one form of exercise that meets my needs, and that is swimming. But I don't have a pool. Nor has there been a gym in my area that offers one. Until practically the very second I needed one to exist. Lo and behold, on practically the very day that I was realizing my only recourse was to swim, a new gym opened up in my area, and it offered a pool. Yesterday I signed up as a member, along with my daughter. Such are the confluence of factors that men call luck.

Great and profound is the name of Mammon.

Mammon, I thank you. Publicly I thank you. Before witnesses competent to comprehend the statement, I thank you. My longtime benefactor, my precious friend in low places, I thank you. Purveyor of good fortune when I didn't even know it was you, I thank you. I know the principle of courtesy has great currency in hell, and so I have honored it. Mammon, I thank you. Great and profound is your name.

idgo

Re: Money
« Reply #9 on: January 10, 2020, 05:32:51 pm »
It's no accident that value as "that thing has value because I will trade you something for it" bears the same name as moral values, as "I think that would be wrong and so I would not do it no matter how much someone paid me". These moral values, uncommon though they may be these days, delineate the only areas which Value-as-money cannot directly control. They seem somewhat unfashionable of late, which is a boon to capitalism as a system and the sorcerers who manipulate their worlds with it alike.

Yes.

No one can serve two masters. Either you will love the one and hate the other, or you will detest the one and cling to the other. You cannot serve both piety and money.

Let the Christians take from that what they will, while I take exactly the opposite.

Interesting, they don't look so separate at all to me. It looks to me like the "master" of Value has a list of demands, and finances are often but not always at the top of that list. This interpretation looks incomplete, though, when I examine the ways in which a non-financial value (perhaps "I shall only work part time so that I can care for cute animals") can be converted into a financial one ("donate money to help save the cute animals who were hurt by a natural disaster!").

Of the magics, I think alchemy is most closely aligned with how money functions in my life. The whole philosopher's stone meme is about eternal life, which can be read as maximizing the time available to spend as one chooses rather than as one feels compelled to. And money fulfills exactly that purpose: I invest some time into lucrative work, as the alchemist invests some lead and other chemicals, and through the vehicle of money received related to that time investment, I can purchase the goods and services that eliminate several times over more drudgery from my life. A few minutes of work becomes money which can provide something I need yet would have had to invest multiple hours to create for myself at the same standard of quality, such as a good meal.

Of course, taking this approach to the extreme, by foisting off all problems of skill save the earning of money onto others, takes one in an entirely different direction from most conventional life goals, by minimizing the opportunities to personally practice and enhance those skills. In one way, the conventional goals are simply a coping mechanism for trying to make do in, instead of break out of, unfortunate situations. In another way, those goals may be reflective of one's actual Will from time to time, in which cases the opportunity to buy away all daily practice can be viewed as a test of whether one is foolish enough to take things that are to one's own disavantage. And ultimately, most concrete skills can be bought as tutelage from their experts with an appropriate financial intervention.

Etu Malku

Re: Money
« Reply #10 on: January 10, 2020, 08:19:46 pm »
Money Magic is Mercuræn Majiq! Wealth and Prosperity tend to be the goal as opposed to simply 'money'. However, the actual goal for the sirius sorcerer is Sovereignty, which for some is to acquire enough wealth & prosperity so that you can come and go as you please, so to speak, or to become a hermit and removed from the demands of the World of Horrors. In either case, the goal is sovereignty in one's life in order to be free from distractions and the necessary time to evolve as a mage.
IAMTHATIAMNOT

Liu

Re: Money
« Reply #11 on: January 11, 2020, 08:27:29 am »
Yes.

No one can serve two masters. Either you will love the one and hate the other, or you will detest the one and cling to the other. You cannot serve both piety and money.

Let the Christians take from that what they will, while I take exactly the opposite.
Why piety? The values I would pit against money are enjoyment and knowledge.
I work in a research field that is completely dependent on public funding and won't ever produce anything of economic value beyond a book perhaps once in a while (and with the current move to open access, probably not even that).

So a significant amount of people willing to work in this field do so because they enjoy doing the kind of work they are doing here and the insights it generates, because they easily could make more money and have an easier time getting a job in almost all other fields. I wouldn't call that piety.

Regarding your post on all the things you thank Mammon for - could you elaborate why you ascribe them to him? As you say, the result of some of these was an improvement of your financial situation, but not of all of them, and the reason why had no more to do with money than I would ascribe it to money if someone starts buying different food (of roughly the same price) to improve their diet. Sure there is money involved in all these things, it just doesn't seem like the essential factor. So your image of Mammon must be much vaster than that.

Km Anu

Re: Money
« Reply #12 on: January 11, 2020, 09:47:50 am »
Mammon Ritual

Remember, Mammon helps those who help themselves, so if an opportunity for enrichment arises, but you have to take action in order to secure it, take that action.

Interesting choice of sounds, reminds me of Fehu. Especially with the bull roar. Similarly,  the method of strong visualization reminds me a bit of the imagery that comes from the rune poems, shifting with each breath.

It also shows just how unnecessary the rune is for every situation, especially just to acquire wealth. It's not as personalized as the above method. The specific details of material wealth remained the focus whereas in my vocal practice, the general idea of wealth would produce very abstract concepts. (Like knowledge or time for example.)

I'll perform this one more time in a week and let you know what else I see.
« Last Edit: January 11, 2020, 09:53:12 am by Km Anu »

Hapu

Re: Money
« Reply #13 on: January 11, 2020, 10:42:25 am »
Mammon Ritual

Interesting choice of sounds, reminds me of Fehu. Especially with the bull roar. Similarly,  the method of strong visualization reminds me a bit of the imagery that comes from the rune poems, shifting with each breath.

Incidentally, I have the Fehu rune tattooed on my left bicep.


I'll perform this one more time in a week and let you know what else I see.

I look forward to it.

Hapu

Re: Money
« Reply #14 on: January 11, 2020, 11:23:42 am »
Why piety? The values I would pit against money are enjoyment and knowledge.

Yet money is the conduit to many forms of enjoyment and knowledge, and piety is the conduit to neither. Whatever enjoyment or knowledge one seems to gain from piety are in fact self-deceit. Piety in general is woven throughout with self-deceit.

Piety is the reason many people take a "best things in life are free" attitude toward life. Sunsets are certainly enjoyable, without question, but for most of us it is pious to choose a sunset over one's favorite food or one's favorite form of entertainment. As for sex, it is one of the most expensive pastimes, at least for the hunter. The hunted can get sex without spending any money.

Public libraries may seem to offer enjoyment and knowledge for free, but this is an illusion. We pay for public libraries with our taxes. Money well spent, I hasten to add.


I work in a research field that is completely dependent on public funding and won't ever produce anything of economic value beyond a book perhaps once in a while (and with the current move to open access, probably not even that).

So a significant amount of people willing to work in this field do so because they enjoy doing the kind of work they are doing here and the insights it generates, because they easily could make more money and have an easier time getting a job in almost all other fields. I wouldn't call that piety.

I wouldn't either. I would call it an economic decision: weighing the opportunity cost of choosing one particular career against the enjoyment and other rewards the career affords.
 

Regarding your post on all the things you thank Mammon for - could you elaborate why you ascribe them to him? As you say, the result of some of these was an improvement of your financial situation, but not of all of them, and the reason why had no more to do with money than I would ascribe it to money if someone starts buying different food (of roughly the same price) to improve their diet. Sure there is money involved in all these things, it just doesn't seem like the essential factor. So your image of Mammon must be much vaster than that.

Mammon is money coming in and money going out, and how and why the money comes in, and how and why the money goes out. Mammon is economics. 
 
Economics is the hydraulics of the anthropological plane.