Author Topic: Satanic Theravada  (Read 159 times)

Hapu

Satanic Theravada
« on: December 02, 2019, 03:11:37 pm »
The Four Ignoble Truths
1. Life has too much power over your happiness.
2. Life's power over your happiness hinges on you pursuing what does not increase your power.
3. You can learn to stop pursuing what does not increase your power.
4. The course of study to learn to stop pursuing what does not increase your power is the Ignoble Eightfold Path.

The Ignoble Eightfold Path
Definition: Power is the ability to shape reality.
Definition: The Seven Infernal Weapons are money, influence, allies, position, opportunity, knowledge, and joy.

1. Horned View: Ever better comprehension of the Four Ignoble Truths and the Seven Infernal Weapons.
2. Horned Will: Put power at the top of your priority list.
3. Horned Words: Say only what will increase your power.
4. Horned Action: Do only what will increase your power.
5. Horned Livelihood: Work only at what will arm you with the Seven Infernal Weapons.
6. Horned Consumption: Take nothing into your mind except what feeds Horned View and Horned Will.
7. Horned Aversion: Hate, guard against, avoid, and destroy what poisons Horned View or Horned Will.
8. Horned Contemplation: Empty your mind of everything but the Satanic beauty of power.


Note: Joy is a weapon by which life can be conquered. It is energy and strength. It is resilience and readiness.
« Last Edit: December 02, 2019, 03:14:14 pm by Hapu »

Peace is a lie, for by opposition I evolve.
Comfort is a lie, for by hardship I evolve.
Mercy is a lie, for by severity I evolve.
Purity is a lie, for by defilement I evolve.
Obedience is a lie, for by rebellion I evolve.
Order is a lie, for by chaos I evolve.
Continuity is a lie, for by death I evolve.
I am the Demon in the Flesh.

idgo

Re: Satanic Theravada
« Reply #1 on: December 02, 2019, 07:04:04 pm »
All this follows, if one accepts its axioms contained.

However, I think that imprecision of your formulation of the first Truth is doing you a disservice: What of a reader who has already wrestled power over their own happiness back from Life?

Were you to phrase it as "Life wants too much power over your happiness", I think it would not lose that portion of the audience.

You invite the reader to fill in their own definition of "life" so long as it's consistent with the rest of the stated system, which postpones the mess of trying to form a shared definition of it until such a time as anyone attempts to extend the system. Clever.

When writing to certain readers, there's great utility in characterizing joy as a means to the end of power, rather than power as a means to the end of joy. However, there's one more step to be taken from "power", and one might worry that if you don't codify it clearly, others will create undesirable things with its absence: You seem to avoid any mention of the uses for which power is acquired; the changes to be made using it once one has it. Your Four Truths carry a certain implication that a lust for happiness underlies the drive for power, but English lacks a word for a longer-term experience than the implied ephemeral nature of simply "being happy".

Or one could simply call this an "amoral" system, as it's all "how" without "why".

Hapu

Re: Satanic Theravada
« Reply #2 on: December 02, 2019, 09:06:02 pm »
All this follows, if one accepts its axioms contained.

However, I think that imprecision of your formulation of the first Truth is doing you a disservice: What of a reader who has already wrestled power over their own happiness back from Life?

Complete power over their own happiness? Well, if they have, then, as the saying goes, "More power to them."

Were you to phrase it as "Life wants too much power over your happiness", I think it would not lose that portion of the audience.

You really think full time happiness is so prevalent that I should consider happy people to be a key demographic?

You invite the reader to fill in their own definition of "life" so long as it's consistent with the rest of the stated system, which postpones the mess of trying to form a shared definition of it until such a time as anyone attempts to extend the system. Clever.

Yes. That Buddha guy had skills.

When writing to certain readers, there's great utility in characterizing joy as a means to the end of power, rather than power as a means to the end of joy. However, there's one more step to be taken from "power", and one might worry that if you don't codify it clearly, others will create undesirable things with its absence: You seem to avoid any mention of the uses for which power is acquired; the changes to be made using it once one has it. Your Four Truths carry a certain implication that a lust for happiness underlies the drive for power, but English lacks a word for a longer-term experience than the implied ephemeral nature of simply "being happy".

I'm purposely presenting power as an end in itself.

Or one could simply call this an "amoral" system, as it's all "how" without "why".

Anything I propose will always be amoral.

Peace is a lie, for by opposition I evolve.
Comfort is a lie, for by hardship I evolve.
Mercy is a lie, for by severity I evolve.
Purity is a lie, for by defilement I evolve.
Obedience is a lie, for by rebellion I evolve.
Order is a lie, for by chaos I evolve.
Continuity is a lie, for by death I evolve.
I am the Demon in the Flesh.

idgo

Re: Satanic Theravada
« Reply #3 on: December 02, 2019, 11:14:43 pm »
All this follows, if one accepts its axioms contained.

However, I think that imprecision of your formulation of the first Truth is doing you a disservice: What of a reader who has already wrestled power over their own happiness back from Life?

Complete power over their own happiness? Well, if they have, then, as the saying goes, "More power to them."

Were you to phrase it as "Life wants too much power over your happiness", I think it would not lose that portion of the audience.

You really think full time happiness is so prevalent that I should consider happy people to be a key demographic?

It seems I wrote imprecisely. To clarify, I think there's a spectrum of how much power over one's happiness life can have. At one extreme would be circumstances where life has no power over someone's happiness; near the middle would be where life has an amount of power over one's happiness that one considers acceptable, and near the other extreme would be where one views life as having "too much" power over their happiness.

I'm near the middle, personally -- I wouldn't say that life has "too much" power over my happiness, yet I allow my happiness to relate to external factors in some ways, because to completely divorce my happiness from the observable results that my actions have in the world would not yield outcomes that I wish to pursue.

Also, I find it amusing that we both assumed the opposite of "life has power over my happiness" would be "I have power over my happiness" when, in fact, that opposite might actually be "nothing has power over my happiness".  Individuals whose happiness is constant and cannot be influenced by internal nor external factors tend to be considered mentally deficient, and more importantly, tend in my experience to have a much more difficult time gaining and using power.

I think that a clinically depressed individual might be the most relatable example of someone whose happiness is not controlled by "life" in the sense of the world around them: no matter how many positive experiences they have, they return to an equilibrium of misery. Similarly, it would take a rather creative definition of "self" to claim that such a person is in control of their own happiness either.

Frater Sisyphus

Re: Satanic Theravada
« Reply #4 on: December 03, 2019, 04:16:11 am »
The Four Ignoble Truths
1. Life has too much power over your happiness.
2. Life's power over your happiness hinges on you pursuing what does not increase your power.
3. You can learn to stop pursuing what does not increase your power.
4. The course of study to learn to stop pursuing what does not increase your power is the Ignoble Eightfold Path.

The Ignoble Eightfold Path
Definition: Power is the ability to shape reality.
Definition: The Seven Infernal Weapons are money, influence, allies, position, opportunity, knowledge, and joy.

1. Horned View: Ever better comprehension of the Four Ignoble Truths and the Seven Infernal Weapons.
2. Horned Will: Put power at the top of your priority list.
3. Horned Words: Say only what will increase your power.
4. Horned Action: Do only what will increase your power.
5. Horned Livelihood: Work only at what will arm you with the Seven Infernal Weapons.
6. Horned Consumption: Take nothing into your mind except what feeds Horned View and Horned Will.
7. Horned Aversion: Hate, guard against, avoid, and destroy what poisons Horned View or Horned Will.
8. Horned Contemplation: Empty your mind of everything but the Satanic beauty of power.


Note: Joy is a weapon by which life can be conquered. It is energy and strength. It is resilience and readiness.

This is awesome  :mrgreen: I can't say there is anything I disagree with, per se. It really brings out more vitality within a Buddhist framework, very cool.
"Whoever adheres to the ruler [of the state] will be tempted away from the right course, and the closer one gets to the ruler the further away one is from God" - Prophet Muhammad (a.s.)

Hapu

Re: Satanic Theravada
« Reply #5 on: December 03, 2019, 11:28:20 am »
...I think there's a spectrum of how much power over one's happiness life can have. At one extreme would be circumstances where life has no power over someone's happiness; near the middle would be where life has an amount of power over one's happiness that one considers acceptable, and near the other extreme would be where one views life as having "too much" power over their happiness.

I agree.


I'm near the middle, personally -- I wouldn't say that life has "too much" power over my happiness, yet I allow my happiness to relate to external factors in some ways, because to completely divorce my happiness from the observable results that my actions have in the world would not yield outcomes that I wish to pursue.

I'm near the extreme where I view life as having too much power over my happiness. Someone else who was living my life might disagree with that assessment. But probably that person would not be on the Left Hand Path.


Also, I find it amusing that we both assumed the opposite of "life has power over my happiness" would be "I have power over my happiness" when, in fact, that opposite might actually be "nothing has power over my happiness".  Individuals whose happiness is constant and cannot be influenced by internal nor external factors tend to be considered mentally deficient, and more importantly, tend in my experience to have a much more difficult time gaining and using power.

I think that a clinically depressed individual might be the most relatable example of someone whose happiness is not controlled by "life" in the sense of the world around them: no matter how many positive experiences they have, they return to an equilibrium of misery. Similarly, it would take a rather creative definition of "self" to claim that such a person is in control of their own happiness either.

Interesting! And valid.

Clinical depression sucks big time.

Peace is a lie, for by opposition I evolve.
Comfort is a lie, for by hardship I evolve.
Mercy is a lie, for by severity I evolve.
Purity is a lie, for by defilement I evolve.
Obedience is a lie, for by rebellion I evolve.
Order is a lie, for by chaos I evolve.
Continuity is a lie, for by death I evolve.
I am the Demon in the Flesh.

Jezebel bat Asmoday

Re: Satanic Theravada
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2019, 01:29:12 pm »
Having delved into Buddhism in the past, this is most interesting. I think I'll try this out, see what works. Thanks for sharing @Hapu.
eritis sicut dii

Km Anu

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Re: Satanic Theravada
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2019, 08:34:24 pm »


I think that a clinically depressed individual might be the most relatable example of someone whose happiness is not controlled by "life" in the sense of the world around them: no matter how many positive experiences they have, they return to an equilibrium of misery. Similarly, it would take a rather creative definition of "self" to claim that such a person is in control of their own happiness either.

My observation is that these people function with a high level of emotional control in some ideal environments. The misery is created by the brain's difficulty processing external stimuli. If the individual exposes themselves to different stimuli the emotional response changes. It's tough to say if "life" can be defined completely as external, but this context sets it up as an external force or experience that is then interpreted internally.

In short, I suspect that even non NT people are readily identifiable because their behaviors are manifesting in an un-natrual (or I suppose hyper evolved) social climate, not because of a neurological deficiency. This would fit the model.

Liu

Re: Satanic Theravada
« Reply #8 on: December 08, 2019, 08:20:43 am »
I'm purposely presenting power as an end in itself.

For what kind of purpose? Sorcerer's lie?
I'd consider happiness higher than power in theory - but I see the point in striving for power instead. Striving for happiness may lead to striving for short-term satisfaction, thereby berefting one of long-term satisfaction if one's pursuit of happiness berefted one of the power to again strive for happiness in the future. Power enables one to pursue happiness, but happiness does not necessarily enable one to pursue power, even though (as you note by listing joy among the Weapons) it may make it easier.

With power as goal, one should nevertheless once in a while check whether the power one gains actually is to one's benefit lest it becomes an empty obsession.

My observation is that these people function with a high level of emotional control in some ideal environments. The misery is created by the brain's difficulty processing external stimuli. If the individual exposes themselves to different stimuli the emotional response changes. It's tough to say if "life" can be defined completely as external, but this context sets it up as an external force or experience that is then interpreted internally.

In short, I suspect that even non NT people are readily identifiable because their behaviors are manifesting in an un-natrual (or I suppose hyper evolved) social climate, not because of a neurological deficiency. This would fit the model.

True - considering that both depression and neurodiversity are influenced by one's genes, if they wouldn't have had advantages or at least no severe disadvantages at some point, they wouldn't be as common as they are now.

Even a lot of the disadvantages I have that I assume to be caused by being on the autism-spectrum are purely or predominately cultural:

- Light-sensitivity - do people really need that amount of light in public buildings, malls and offices? And why do people consider sunny weather something good? I can see well enough with just a desk light or candle for most purposes.

- Communication difficulties for various reasons: Why do people consider parties the optimal environment for conversations? Why did no one ever teach me how to let people know that I want to say something in a group conversation? Why do they talk about so many boring things? xD And why are people so slow at thinking that they can't follow my complex syntactic structures? ;) (okay, some of these points are just human nature I guess)

- Empathy-impairment, phantom-limb-sensations and unusual sexuality: none of these are necessarily problems on their own - I think the advantages outweigh the disadvantages - but they are nothing that one could talk about openly in most contexts. Empathy is considered the epitome of morality. Phantom-limb-sensations (or am I just feeling my astral body? ;)) that are not related to lost limbs might be considered a spiritual skill in other cultures but are basically unheard of here, except on the fringe, among occultists and furries. And nowadays kinks are much more acceptable than they used to be, but your upbringing still does nothing to prepare you for being e.g. asexual.

- Even clumsiness could be considered culture-dependent: if sports classes would put more focus on body awareness (e.g. yoga or feldenkrais exercises) and actually teach proper movement instead of expecting people to just learn by imitating and thereby giving me the feeling that I simply suck at sports and shouldn't even try lest I hurt myself - then I perhaps wouldn't need to go to physiotherapy and/or teach that stuff to myself now.

In lots of these cases, just a bit more awareness in this culture that this may be something that I can't simply fix by the standard approaches or just by trying harder would have done a lot for my mental wellbeing.

But on the other hand, to return to the thread's topic: It did result in me striving for power, especially in the form of increasing my knowledge. If I was not feeling as much of an outcast I might be much less ambitious and not feel my inner will as strongly.

Btw, does ADHD also count as non-NT? I recently encountered some discussion on it at another forum, and the gist was that it depends on which exact cause it actually has (which experts would still disagree on), i.e. whether the chemical imbalance is caused by having a different brain structure or whether it's its own thing and may cause a different brain structure secondarily.
« Last Edit: December 08, 2019, 08:47:44 am by Liu »

Km Anu

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Re: Satanic Theravada
« Reply #9 on: December 11, 2019, 06:29:48 am »
I'm purposely presenting power as an end in itself.


Btw, does ADHD also count as non-NT? I recently encountered some discussion on it at another forum, and the gist was that it depends on which exact cause it actually has (which experts would still disagree on), i.e. whether the chemical imbalance is caused by having a different brain structure or whether it's its own thing and may cause a different brain structure secondarily.

I loved this entire reply. But yes, it does. Our understanding of ADHD has changed a lot in recent years. ADHD is less a hyperactivity disorder than an impulse control disorder. Its impairment effects executive function. Typically in study groups Non-ADHD participants are referred to as NT. Oh also, I was addressing depression, which I don't have. My observations are interaction based.

« Last Edit: December 11, 2019, 06:36:47 am by Km Anu »