Forum => Luciferianism => General LHP Discussion => Mercuræn Luciferianism => Topic started by: Etu Malku on August 11, 2018, 10:48:17 pm

Title: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Etu Malku on August 11, 2018, 10:48:17 pm
The word Lucifer can be traced to the ancient ideals surrounding the myths associated with the Morningstar and his brother the Evening Star. Early on these myths place the Morningstar into the role of the attempted usurper who is defeated and becomes a ‘fallen’ deity as in Sumerian and Assyrian cosmology. It would not be until the Gnostics of the 1st century A.D. and Milton’s ‘Paradise Lost’ (1667 A.D.) found Lucifer to be the Serpent in the Garden of Eden and transformed the myth of the Fallen Morningstar into that of the angel Lucifer the principle of compassion for life and creation, defiance of corrupt authority and the current of spiritual evolution.

Babylonian myth has the very first association to the concept of a 'fallen' deity and its association with the Morning Star. The Sumerian king Etana is driven by his pride to strive for the highest seat among the star‑gods on the Northern Mountain . . . but was hurled down by the supreme ruler of the Babylonian Olympus.

A Canaanite myth from Phonecia called the "Fall of the day star" describes the fall of Helel ben Shahar (Son of the Dawn). Another Ugaritic myth called the Baal cycle describes the fall of the god Attar from Saphon and the "invasion of the garden of gods".

In another Mesopotamian myth, the god Helel tries to overthrow the great god El. Eventually, these myths became the Sumerian story of Ishtar and Inanna's descent into the Underworld. Here Inanna is directly associated with the planet Venus.

Later, Helel is translated into Greek as Eosphorus/Phosphorus. And in this translation, the word means ‘light/dawn bearer’ while  Hesperus, the Evening Star is the Son of the Dawn goddess Eos. The Greeks finally accepted the Babylonian view that the two Stars were the same, and the Babylonian identification of the planets with the Great Gods, and dedicated the "wandering star" to Aphrodite (Roman Venus), as its equivalent.

Roman religion would use the Latin word 'lucifer' as an adjective applied to the Moon. As a noun, it was associated with "Morning Star", its divine personification as "the fabled son of Aurora and Cephalus, and father of Ceyx". The second of the meanings attached to the word when used as a noun corresponds to the image in Greek mythology of Eos, the Goddess of Dawn, giving birth to the morning star Phosphorus.
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Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: pi_rameses on August 12, 2018, 12:46:40 am
Welcome @Etu Malku (http://orderoftheserpent.org/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=215)
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Onyx on August 13, 2018, 03:50:54 am
Hey @Etu Malku (http://orderoftheserpent.org/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=215) , I can make a new sub-category here for the Mercuræn paradigm if you want. And also I found your History of the Morningstar essay which should be of interest to people here, feel free to post that or anything else.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Etu Malku on August 13, 2018, 09:48:51 am
If you are willing to create a Mercuræn category then I am willing to add content and drag some bodies here. Thank you.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Onyx on August 13, 2018, 12:07:27 pm
Added a child board to this one, use it as you may. I can sticky an intro/overview there if you want.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Etu Malku on August 13, 2018, 12:58:39 pm
Sure thing, thanks
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: pi_rameses on August 13, 2018, 11:43:45 pm
Are you guys seeing the like button or it's just me who doesn't see it?
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Xepera maSet on August 14, 2018, 12:02:23 am
I don't see it.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: pi_rameses on August 14, 2018, 12:17:09 am
Ok. Giving it a thumbs up for now.  :thumbsup: Will look into it when free.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Olive on August 14, 2018, 08:01:47 pm
Interesting. I consider Lucifer a venusian entity for similar reasons. The Morning star always usurps the sun, but is again thrown down by him. The Babylonians had quite a talent for astrological theology.

I have never heard of Lucifer being applied to the Moon, and I'm a bit of a fan. Could you provide a source for that particular claim? If it's too much trouble don't bother, I'll track down the reference if it's possible.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Etu Malku on August 14, 2018, 08:53:42 pm
Charlton T. Lewis, Charles Short, "A Latin Dictionary" . . .

Not much to go on I'm afraid, but I do have a greater depth of association between Roman Lucifer and various pre-Islamic Arabian Moon deities, that I will go into depth on with the book I am writing.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: crossfire on August 31, 2018, 01:32:16 am
Interesting. I consider Lucifer a venusian entity for similar reasons. The Morning star always usurps the sun, but is again thrown down by him. The Babylonians had quite a talent for astrological theology.

I have never heard of Lucifer being applied to the Moon, and I'm a bit of a fan. Could you provide a source for that particular claim? If it's too much trouble don't bother, I'll track down the reference if it's possible.
Hekate (here with Hermes, Persephone, & Demeter) is a moon goddess holding her two torches--one for the Morning Star and one for the Evening Star:
(http://www.theoi.com/image/T16.6Hekate.jpg)
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: crossfire on August 31, 2018, 01:59:21 am
The Morning Star lead the horses of the sun, but the Evening Star lead the horses of the moon.
Statius, Thebaid 8. 159 ff :
"Dark Vesper (the Evening Star) [Hesperos] is already leading forth the horses of the moon."
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: pi_rameses on August 31, 2018, 02:16:35 am
Mercuræn Luciferianism is easily becoming one of my favorite boards created in the forum as of late. Excellent contributions, everyone :) Also, thanks @Etu Malku (http://orderoftheserpent.org/forum/index.php?action=profile;u=215) for sharing.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Olive on August 31, 2018, 05:35:54 am
Hekate (here with Hermes, Persephone, & Demeter) is a moon goddess holding her two torches--one for the Morning Star and one for the Evening Star:
(http://www.theoi.com/image/T16.6Hekate.jpg)

Cool stuff. I do find it a little odd to call Venus the torch of the moon, since she is so much more strongly linked to the motions of the Sun. I'm not sure exactly when your image was created, but apparently there was a time in Greek culture when the twin aspects of the morning star and the evening star had not yet been reconciled as one entity - the luminary Venus. I sort of see a connection to this in the representation of the two torches.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: crossfire on August 31, 2018, 07:01:22 am
Hekate (here with Hermes, Persephone, & Demeter) is a moon goddess holding her two torches--one for the Morning Star and one for the Evening Star:
(http://www.theoi.com/image/T16.6Hekate.jpg)

Cool stuff. I do find it a little odd to call Venus the torch of the moon, since she is so much more strongly linked to the motions of the Sun. I'm not sure exactly when your image was created, but apparently there was a time in Greek culture when the twin aspects of the morning star and the evening star had not yet been reconciled as one entity - the luminary Venus. I sort of see a connection to this in the representation of the two torches.
You can see the development of Hekate as the triple moon goddess in this statue from the Lourve Museum:  caption:

English: The Moon-goddess Selene or Luna accompanied by the Dioscuri, or Phosphoros (the Morning Star) and Hesperos (the Evening Star). Marble altar, Roman artwork, 2nd century CE. From Italy.

(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/09/Altar_Selene_Louvre_Ma508.jpg/745px-Altar_Selene_Louvre_Ma508.jpg)
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Liu on August 31, 2018, 06:33:24 pm
The Dioscuri equated to Phosphoros and Hesperos? Now that's new to me, I wonder how the writer of that statue explanation came up with it. I don't know whether it's wrong, I just never heard of that equation before. I see some smallish parallels between them, though, so there might be something to it. Any further information?
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: crossfire on August 31, 2018, 09:05:56 pm
The Dioscuri equated to Phosphoros and Hesperos? Now that's new to me, I wonder how the writer of that statue explanation came up with it. I don't know whether it's wrong, I just never heard of that equation before. I see some smallish parallels between them, though, so there might be something to it. Any further information?
Castor and Pollux as the Morning Star and the Evening Star:  One was always in the underworld (not seen) while the other was in the heavens (visible sky.)  Both were associated with horses:  the Morning Star driving the horses pulling the chariot of the Sun, and the Evening Star driving the horses pulling the Chariot of the Moon.
Title: Re: Origin of Lucifer
Post by: Liu on September 01, 2018, 10:52:19 am
The Dioscuri equated to Phosphoros and Hesperos? Now that's new to me, I wonder how the writer of that statue explanation came up with it. I don't know whether it's wrong, I just never heard of that equation before. I see some smallish parallels between them, though, so there might be something to it. Any further information?
Castor and Pollux as the Morning Star and the Evening Star:  One was always in the underworld (not seen) while the other was in the heavens (visible sky.)  Both were associated with horses:  the Morning Star driving the horses pulling the chariot of the Sun, and the Evening Star driving the horses pulling the Chariot of the Moon.
Yes, thanks, that's basically the parallels I also noticed, but I have no idea whether they were already equated in antiquity.